As we all crowd round our TV sets watching the Euro 2012 football games a recent report has applied economics to the competition and come to some interesting conclusions.

ING commissioned TNS Nipo to conduct an online survey of at least 1,000 people in each of the 16 participating countries. The aim being to see how much in money terms a national victory would be worth to their supporters. The full table of results is at the foot of this article.

From the results it can be seen that the Portuguese are the most passionate football supporters with 42% calling themselves big football fans. England came in 7th with 24% and Ireland at 8th with 22%.

The amount of money that fans would pay to see their country lift the title averaged out at €98, but the Irish would pay €295 apiece to see their countrymen hoist the cup with England in second place prepared to stump up €207.

But to compare like with like more appropriately respondents were asked if they would sacrifice 1% of their wages to see their country win. On this basis Poland came out top with a huge 49% saying that they would waive 1% of their wages for a Polish win. Only 12% of English fans (9th place) would make this sacrifice but 29% of the Irish would (4th place).

On another measure, the number of holiday days a fan would give up, the average Ukranian was the most generous and would give up 10.2 days. The Irish would give up 4.3 days in 6th place and the English a miserly 1.9 days back in tenth.

Ukranians also top the table with the most number of days they will be taking off over the course of the competition as well as topping the ‘Pride’ table.

The most looked forward to dream final would be between Spain and Germany (9%), with an England / Germany match second (6%) and an England / Spain final third (5%).

Table of results (Data from ING):

Rank

Football fans % big fans

Value of title (EUR)

Sacrifice in holidays (days)

1% of income sacrificed (%)

Fan paraphernalia (EUR)

Days off

Pride (%)

1 Por (42%) Irl (EUR 295) Ukr (10.2) Pol (49%) Rus (EUR 31) Ukr (9.3) Ukr (88%)
2 Ita (34%) Eng (EUR 207) Rus (7.9) Ukr (42%) Irl (EUR 28) Rus (7.8) Por (81%)
3 Esp (30%) Gre (EUR 187) Pol (6.8) Rus (33%) Pol (EUR 19) Irl (4.4) Rus (81%)
4 Ger (29%) Ita (EUR 167) Gre (4.8) Irl (29%) Ukr (EUR 19) Pol (4.3) Pol (77%)
5 Gre (28%) Esp (EUR 130) Cro (4.6) Gre (26%) Esp (EUR 18) Eng (2.7) Gre (74%)
6 Swe (24%) Por (EUR 112) Irl (4.3) Cro (22%) Ita (EUR 16) Cro (2.5) Cro (68%)
7 Eng (24%) Pol (EUR 98) Cze (3.5) Cze (16%) Gre (EUR 16) Esp (1.9) Esp (67%)
8 Irl (22%) Fra (EUR 91) Por (2.9) Por (12%) Eng (EUR 15) Gre (1.7) Cze (60%)
9 Den (21%) Ger (EUR 65) Ita (1.9) Eng (12%) Fra (EUR 11) Cze (1.6) Ita (59%)
10 Ned (19%) Ukr (EUR 43) Eng (1.9) Swe (9%) Cze (EUR 11) Ger (1.3) Eng (58%)
11 Cro (19%) Ned (EUR 39) Esp (1.9) Den (8%) Por (EUR 9) Swe (1.1) Den (56%)
12 Pol (18%) Cro (EUR 37) Swe (1.9) Ita (8%) Cro (EUR 8.0) Ita (1.1) Swe (55%)
13 Ukr (15%) Swe (EUR 34) Den (1.3) Esp (8%) Ger (EUR 8.0) Ned (0.8) Ned (42%)
14 Cze (14%) Den (EUR 23) Ger (1.2) Fra (4%) Swe (EUR 7) Fra (0.6) Fra (40%)
15 Rus (14%) Rus (EUR 22) Fra (0.8) Ger (4%) Den (EUR 7) Den (0.6) Ger (33%)
16 Fra (12%) Cze (EUR 14) Ned (0.5) Ned (2%) Ned (EUR 4) Por (0.5) Irl (29%)
Euro 2012 by Petar Milošević

Euro 2012 by Petar Milošević

Image by Petar Milošević (Harkov vokzal.jpg) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

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