More than a quarter (26 percent) of adults aged between 20 and 34 were living with their parents in 2013. That amounts to some 3.3 million people.

In 1996 when these numbers were first collected by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) this figure stood at 2.7 million or 21 percent of that age group still living with their parents.

The ONS data also shows that the increase in the numbers has been sharper since the start of the country’s economic slowdown (see graph below).

Looking at just 20 to 24 year-olds nearly half (49 percent) lived with their parents in 2013. For 25 to 29 year-olds this drops to 21 percent and only 8 percent for 30 to 34 year-olds.

On a gender basis, for all those between 20 and 34 years old there are 2.1 million men still living with parents compared to 1.2 million women.

Young adults aged 20-34 living with parents in the UK 1996-2013

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Unsurprisingly those living with their parents were found to be more likely to be unemployed – 13 percent of those living at home were unemployed compared to 6 percent of those not living with parents. But those considered ‘inactive’ were more likely to have moved out with 16 percent of those living with parents being inactive compared to 20 percent of those not living with their parents. This left the proportion of those employed being roughly equal at 72 percent for those living with parents and 74 percent for those not living with parents.

For those between 35 and 64 about two percent live with their parents, a number that has been largely stable since 1996 says the ONS.

Looking at this on a regional basis we find that Norther Ireland has the highest proportion of 20 to 34 year-olds living at home (36 percent) and London the lowest (22 percent).

Young adults aged 20-34 living with parents by UK country-English region 2011-2013

Young adults aged 20-34 living with parents by UK country-English region 2011-2013

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