The streets of Aberdare were lined with around 5,000 fans who had come to pay their respects to the Welsh drumming legend that was Stuart Cable.

And Stuart could not have asked for a better send off.

His coffin had the AC/DC Lightening Logo on the side which was carried inside a horse drawn carriage to the sound of Back in Black by AC/DC blasting over a loudspeaker.

The loud music continued even inside the church where one of his favourite bands High Voltage continued to bring rock to the celebration of Stuart's life after which a male voice choir sang .

Rhys Ifans, Rob Brydon and The Sterophonics lead singer and guitarist Kelly Jones were amongst many stars there to send off their old friend.

Stuart's father died aged 40 when Stuart was just aged 10 and now in a tragic repeat he also leaves a 9 year old son who I am sure will always know how much his father meant to the people of Wales and that his father was a hero to many as were the rest of the boys in the band who broke out of Aberdare and took on the world of rock and took no prisoners.

But Stuart is now resting with his forefathers in the country that he loved so and I leave this article with a song by W S Gwynne Williams that holds a special place in the hearts of Welshmen (The last verse says it all) and seems appropriate even though he would probably have hated the idea of an Aled Jones tribute….sorry Stu you can give me a kicking in the next life for this one.


I am dreaming of the mountains of my home,
Of the mountains where in childhood I would roam.
I have dwelt ‘neath summer skies,
Where the summer never dies,
But my heart is in the mountains of my home.

I can see the little homestead on the hill,
I can hear the magic music of the rill.
There is nothing to compare,
With the love that once was there,
In that lonely little homestead on the hill.

I can see the quiet churchyard down below,
Where the mountain breezes wander to and fro.
And when God my soul will keep,
It is there I want to sleep,
With those dear old folks that loved me long ago.

W S Gwynne Williams

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