The answer to a parliamentary question posed by Nicholas Soames MP shows that over two thirds of all babies born in the capital had one or more foreign parents in 2010.

Now, before all those with an agenda based around race sharpen their pencils or dip their pens in the vitriolic ink, this is not a question about race it is a question of social cohesion. Then ask yourself why I had to say this at all. The term foreign parents does also include those from within the EU.

Also another way of looking at this is that London leads the way in multiculturalism.

Nicholas Soames, Conservative MP for Mid Sussex, is Co-Chairman, with Frank Field MP, of the Cross Party Group on Balanced Migration so is quite entitled to ask such a question. Also, the term foreign does not mean that there is any reference to race, only those with an agenda would argue otherwise.

Migration Watch, an independent think tank that says it wants to present the public with full and accurate facts, said in response to the data "These extraordinary figures illustrate the huge and rapid change that is taking place in our capital city. They illustrate the way in which London is being changed beyond recognition and on a scale and at a speed that makes successful integration so much more difficult. It is a stark reminder to the government to stick to their promise to get net migration down to the tens of thousands by the end of this Parliament."

During 2010, in only six out of the 32 London Boroughs did the proportion of babies born where one or both parents are foreign fall below 50%. In Newham the figure was 84% and in 81% in Westminster.

The full table from 2010 is as follows (source – parliamentonline.co.uk/hansard/hocw/120220w0002.htm#12022047000062):

Area of mother’s usual residence Number of births to one or more foreign parents Proportion of births to one or more foreign born parents
London

86,111

64.7

Inner London

38,224

70.0

Camden

2,135

69.8

Hackney plus City of London

3,227

69.0

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,819

65.6

Haringey

3,242

72.8

Islington

1,757

59.5

Kensington and Chelsea

1,757

59.5

Lambeth

3,221

65.3

Lewisham

3,067

61.6

Newham

5,266

84.1

Southwark

3,498

68.2

Tower Hamlets

3,571

78.2

Wandsworth

3,179

57.3

Westminster

2,485

81.2

Outer London

47,887

61.0

Barking and Dagenham

2,414

64.7

Barnet

3,559

64.2

Bexley

1,009

33.7

Brent

4,294

81.9

Bromley

1,355

33.3

Croydon

3,081

55.7

Ealing

4,526

77.2

Enfield

3,414

66.7

Greenwich

2,850

61.0

Harrow

2,640

75.4

Havering

687

24.4

Hillingdon

2,487

59.3

Hounslow

3,121

70.4

Kingston upon Thames

1,139

49.3

Merton

2,268

64.4

Redbridge

3,101

69.5

Richmond upon Thames

1,385

46.3

Sutton

1,066

39.9

Waltham Forest

3,491

72.4

But we must not just look at these figures and draw conclusions. Remember that many of these children may well end up being ‘British’ under current legislation. That will mean that their children will be born of British parents. So if these families remain in London these statistics may well reverse over the coming years. And some could end up taking their families back to their home countries.

The questions we have to answer are: whether this situation is really a danger to social cohesion or not. Or should we welcome this and help people integrate as much as possible where we can? And finally, do we have the right to force people to integrate any further than just obeying the law of the land?

But we do need to think and talk about this and not bury and forget about it for fear of being labelled 'racist'.

Piccadilly Circus-By

Piccadilly Circus-By Justinc

Image by Justinc (CC2.0) via Wikimedia Commons

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